social enterprise

The Business of Nonprofits

This blog post has been the hardest I've ever had to write. The answer is so simple and trite; but, deserves a fuller explanation. The one thing that non-profits need most of all in regards to funding is a systemic change in the organization. The trend in non-profits today seems to be that more Executive Directors are coming from the for-profit sector. Therefore, they have the business acumen to lead and grow the organization. However, they still have a Board to contend with as well as a staff that has "traditional non-profit thinking". Now I know you are thinking: "This may be true in some non-profit organization; but, not in mine." Bear with me a bit longer as I dig deeper into this thought. I have spoken to people who consult with non-profit EDs on an almost daily basis; I have sat at round table discussions with consultants who travel the United States speaking, consulting, and training non-profit organizations. This is the norm; systemic change is necessary!

Nancy Lublin stated "Non-profits have huge inefficiencies and overlaps....This is wasteful and bad business." In Nancy's blog "The Foundations Four Biggest Faux Pas" she states: Stop mistaking marketing for overhead -- and stop hating on overhead. We're all running businesses, and we've all got more expenses than we want. But your constant refrain about us spending too much on communications staff, graphic design, and public relations is misguided. "Scaling up" means that people need to know about us. It also means that we'll have to spend money on expenses that you label with the most unfairly pejorative word in our business: overhead.

Non-profits are being seen by philanthropists more as a business; those in the non-profit sector need to think more like businessmen and women. Results are trumping the cause and the personal relationship as high net worth donors look at giving. They are looking at sustainable income, outcomes, ROIs, and a multi-year funding cycle. This is the mindset of an investor not a donor! Funders (investors) and donors think differently in five key areas: a need for funding, an approach to the problem, funding level, measuring success, and delivering results. (More information can be found in "ROI for Nonprofits and Asking Rights" by Tom Ralser.)

Systemic change and a forward-thinking leadership team may just be the keys to your success. Wishing you success!

Turning Passion Into Profit

To help you define what you are passionate about, I suggest you read about issues plaguing our society and our world. Reflect on causes that strike a nerve with you and network with others that have an interest in similar causes. It is my belief that if you speak with those who are interested in similar causes you may gain a different perspective and perhaps be able to see solutions that you wouldn't otherwise see. The passion of some of the Changemakers from these organizations can be found in these books: Tattoos on the Heart, Black Faces in White Places, Who Owns the Ice House. I'm sure there are many other stories; but, these are truly inspirational and will get you started.

So once you find your passion and launch, how can you sustain and grow? Understandably, impact is a priority for the social entrepreneur. The key is to stay true to your passion, and to operate with persistence and patience. But, it's also important to find support. There is so much support available. First, find someone you can communicate directly with. That goes back to the advice of finding a mentor. Next, leverage your existing resources; this includes community, current staff and volunteers, and your funds.

As I spoke to the leaders from various social enterprises, they all shared the trials of growing pains. Sometimes the founders had the vision that inspired others to join them. These founders led the movement to address the social injustice close to their heart; however, at a certain point they found that their skills were causing the enterprise to become stagnant. To grow, they would have to pass the baton to someone else or they would be ineffective at moving forward to touch more lives. That is not failure; that is recognizing that each of us is capable of a certain level of vision and leadership.

Sometimes our purpose in life may be only to plant the seed and launch a team of advocates, and then the team together becomes a catalyst for something bigger. Sometimes growing pains meant learning that they had programs that weren't marketable. One organization that worked with people with a criminal background tried to market services; however, found that clients wouldn't let the former criminals in their homes to perform services. Other organizations just found that there wasn't enough of a market for their products, so that offering wasn't profitable. If you are a social enterprise that offers multiple products and/or services it's good business practice to keep your accounting practices separate for each one so you know if you have a product/service that is draining your revenue dollars or carrying your enterprise. To entrepreneurs this may seem elementary; but, to someone focused on mission they want everything to work. This feedback was given to me several times in my interviews. I was guilty of this as well in my social enterprises. When you are focused on mission and every idea was your "baby" it's hard to see when it's not working. A good resource for the entire journey from idea to incubation and growth is your local non-profit resource center.

In recent years the lines have blurred between non-profit and for-profit entities; non-profits have become more "business like" and profit seeking while for-profits have begun to embrace social and environmental causes clearing supporting those causes on their marketing collateral. There are two areas where social enterprises have admittedly fallen short: business plan development and sales and marketing. For those entrepreneurs ready to dive into the world of social enterprises, be aware and plan ahead, to seek business acumen in these two areas. Social enterprise is definitely on the rise and there are so many resources, both free and tuition or fee based. For large scale resources to obtain knowledge I would highly recommend Social Enterprise Alliance and Ashoka U. There is a rise in discussion regarding "B Corps" and "L3Cs". These are terms that are being entered into legislation to have a specific designation for social enterprises.

I, and many experts in the industry, believe that the way non-profits sustain is changing. Non-profits cannot be as dependent upon donors and grants to fund them. That funding has decreased in recent years. Therefore, non-profits must look at the idea of social enterprise for sustainability and covering operational costs through unrestricted funds. It amazes me that in traditional business we know that profit helps keep the lights on; but, in non-profits most grants won't cover keeping the lights on. Is this thought provoking to you?

Social Enterprise: From Its Roots to Mainstream Conversation

Can you believe the social enterprise business model has been in existence since before 1900? Yes, it's true! Goodwill Industries was founded in 1895 (although that wasn't its official name until 1915) in Boston by Reverend Edgar Helms. Reverend Helms, theological student, was sent to minister in a struggling inner city mission. When he saw the deplorable conditions these immigrants lived in, Reverend Helms knew he must find a way to employ them. He collected unwanted goods from the homes of the wealthy and allowed immigrants to repair and refurbish them. After they were made suitable for sale, the goods were sold in thrift stores. The profits from the sales paid the impoverished immigrants wages. By 1920 there were 15 Goodwill stores around the country. Reverend Helms had a larger vision for this enterprise though; his goal was to make Goodwill an international organization. Amazingly, this model is successfully used today by Goodwill Industries, and copied by thousands of other organizations. Goodwill Industries is quite obviously a successful social enterprise model that has withstood the test of time. Reverend Helms was a visionary entrepreneur before his time. The Wagner-O'Day Act was passed in 1938 by President Roosevelt. This legislative action paved the way for over 600 social enterprises to employ over 48,000 people with disabilities today. If Social Enterprise has been a successful business model for over 100 years, why are we just now giving it the attention it deserves?

Social Enterprise is practiced around the world. The largest social enterprise in terms of annual sales and size of staff was founded in Spain in 1956. The inspiration for it was due to the large amount of unemployment after the Spanish Civil War. Today theMondragon Corporacion Cooperative (MCC) consists of 120 companies, 42,000 worker-owners; and operates 43 schools and one college. The internet has given rise to the awareness and effectiveness of the social enterprise movement. Before the rise of the internet several organizations made an impact on their causes, such as Ten Thousand Villages and Denver Children's Museum. Again, these business models have proven successful and have been modeled by others. Bajalia International Group has an online model similar to Ten Thousand Villages supporting artisans in disadvantaged areas and selling their goods around the world. The internet has allowed us to see the impact Social Enterprises are having, and enabling us to study them. Women's Bean Project in Denver, Colorado not only sells there products locally; but, is able to have a worldwide customer base through their website and Wal-Mart.com. Many of our college students want to have a career that provides an income while making a change in the world. By studying model organizations that have created an effective Social Enterprise, they can gather inspiration and knowledge. Some Social Enterprises that are worthy of studying can be found on www.se-alliance.org Here is an excerpt from Seth Godin's blog "Non-profits have a charter to be innovators": "Non-profits have an obligation to be leaders in innovation, but sometimes they hesitate. One reason: "We're doing important work. Our funders count on us to be reasonable and cautious and proven, because the work we're doing is too important to risk failure." One alternative: "We're doing important work. Our funders count on us to be daring and bold and brave, because the work we're doing is too important to play it safe." This is the reason we have to educate the non-profit and philanthropic sectors about social entrepreneurship.

The Stanford Social Innovation Review conducted a webinar recently; in that webinar social entrepreneurs from 4 countries spoke on their experiences in the social enterprise sector. Although social enterprise is in the early adopter phase, it has become a mainstream topic of conversation around the world. Will you join the conversation? I look forward to hearing from you.

Social Enterprise: Is It a Necessity

They say necessity is the mother of invention. After the recession of 2008, government funding declined for social programs. Despite recovery, we will probably never see the same level of government funding again. The major reason, in my opinion, is that health care costs are expected to grow at twice the rate of state revenue growth over the next 20 years. This is due to an aging population and spiraling health care costs. Have you heard that approximately 8,000 people a day are turning 65?!

What does health care have to do with social enterprise? Well, as a result of government funding cuts there are fewer resources available for human services. Programs that address workforce development Cafe Reconcile , higher education , recidivism rates, poverty, and homelessness are an investment in long-term social and economic growth. These programs are imperative to a healthy society, and can be addressed by successful models of social enterprise.

As one who has been immersed into these social ills of our society, I am passionate about promoting the idea of social enterprise. I have always been entrepreneurial; but, being entrepreneurial AND addressing social ills of our society is a win-win-win. The approach to social enterprise needs to integrate the best practices of the non-profit sector with the business acumen of the for-profit sector. As I have interviewed several senior level executives in the for-profit sector recently, they typically feel that non-profits do not have the business acumen for social enterprise, thus hindering them to achieve important long-term outcomes. There are times I agree with this statement. The non-profit world has long since been known to operate on a shoestring and focus on the mission; this usually meant eliminating best practices used by the for-profit sector. What is the solution if those leading the non-profit organizations in our communities don't have the necessary business acumen? (Stay tuned for Part 2)

Global Links

Two Tupperware executives, Rick Goings and Elinor Steele, visited Iraq in 2011 as part of a Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability. While there, they realized Iraq lacked a small and medium enterprise (SME) sector and a robust entrepreneurial class. Women suffer from this the most; they have the highest unemployment, greater barriers to credit, and weak labor laws. Despite the fact that Iraq is poised to experience double-digit growth in the coming years, women must be a part of this growth for the greatest impact.

These realizations sparked a collaborative effort between Tupperware Brands, Rollins College, and the U.S. Secretary of State’s Office of Global Women’s Issues. It’s awe-inspiring to think a local, Central Florida company and a small, local college can make a global impact! The result is the Global Links Scholar program.

This partnership invites a female professor from Iraq, hosted by Rollins College, to come and learn skills in five key areas: career, culture, curriculum, community, and coaching through a train-the-trainer model. Ultimately, this opportunity provides the professor with the skills for her to return to Iraq and teach and empower other women to contribute to the future of their country.

The inaugural Global Links Scholar, Dr. Amel Abed Mohammed Ali, was selected and arrived on the campus of Rollins College in January 2012, one short year after Rick and Elinor traveled to Iraq. Dr. Ali is an accomplished researcher, focused primarily on change management and thought leadership. Tupperware Brands and Rollins College provides a perfect fit for this highly accomplished professor. During her Global Links experience she participated in a specially-designed graduate level curriculum that focused on entrepreneurship (both traditional and social, notably Rollins College is an Ashoka designated campus), women business ownership, and financial self-sufficiency. During her externship at Tupperware Brands, Dr. Ali learned the fundamentals of sales, strategic planning, market analysis, and general management skills.

Dr. Ali shares the Global Links program will enable her to “develop both the intellectual and economic standard of Iraqi women as well as the Iraqi community”

In 2013, Dr. Ali returned home to teach students the skills she learned through the Global Links program. And, a partnership was formed with Women for Women International (WfWI). Through these developments a career center was formed and social entrepreneurship classes are offered. The students who are part of this program are learning the importance of social entrepreneurship and community engagement. After completing the coursework, the students are eligible to apply for a two-week immersion program at Rollins College. The first group of students spent time with Rollins students in relevant seminars on social entrepreneurship and participated with local community organizations to develop leadership skills.

Over the next five years the goal is to replicate the program, leveraging these lessons on a global level.

Follow the progress of the Global Links Program on their Facebook page.

Ron Ben-Zeev: Shaking the Entrepreneur Ecosystem in Orlando

Ron Ben-Zeev noticed there weren’t many resources in Orlando in 2010 for entrepreneurs. As an entrepreneur, Ron describes himself as a “find a need and fill it kind of person”. There was certainly a need and he knew there were other entrepreneurs in the community that had the same need of resources. Let me digress by sharing how Ron became an entrepreneur then we’ll fast-forward to seeing how this journey allows Ron to see the needs of the Central Florida community in 2010. Without his background, he would not have been able to be a part of the thought leaders that brought an ecosystem for entrepreneurs to Orlando.

 Ron began his entrepreneurial journey as a 13 year-old boy in France. During Labor Day (May Day in France), the beautiful, exotic Lily of the Valley is used in celebration. As a young boy riding his bike through the countryside, he found a field of Lily of the Valley flowers; Labor Day was the following week. Preparedness met opportunity. Luck is where opportunity meets preparation. Ron picked many of the lilies, sold them at 100% profit, and caught the entrepreneur bug.

 During Ron’s first trip to the United States with his parents, he noticed the Sony Walkman trend. Seeing the Panasonic product that was its competitor, Ron made calls, negotiated a contract, and shipped Panasonic’s product to Switzerland. Bringing this product to a new market, Ron, although young, became an accomplished entrepreneur.

 Ron recalls his days as a student at Wharton School of Business. Back in the 80’s “not many studied  entrepreneurship”; he did. However, as a foreign student, Ron wasn’t able to get a job other than on campus and there were no jobs available. Once again, Ron found himself creating his own job. As a “find a need and fill it kind of person” Ron always found a way to make money. Upon graduation, he interviewed with a company and was chosen among the top candidates; but, the only one without a Master’s Degree. As they offered Ron the position, he asked the hiring team why they would choose him. Their answer became Ron’s defining moment. They replied, “We want you because you don’t know it can’t be done; therefore, you’ll find a way to get it done.” Today Ron still finds a way to get it done.

 One of Ron’s pet peeves is people who sit on their idea and never act. He quips, “Ideation without execution is just an hallucination.”

 Ron spent some time in corporate America as an intrapreneur (before the word was even coined). He attacked silos, met resistance, but found solutions. His philosophy during his tenure in corporate America was to be pragmatic and “get shit done”.

 He has certainly been a part of “getting shit done” here in Central Florida. Today Orlando has a Women’s Business Incubator, 3 co-working spaces, 1 Million Cups, Starter Studio, Startup Weekend, and is also Rollins College first entrepreneur-in-residence. Ron has played an integral role in 1MC, Startup Weekend, and Rollins College’s Entrepreneurship initiatives. There are certainly other resources in Orlando; these are just a few.. But, one thing Ron realizes is “it takes a village” and he credits several other entrepreneurs for championing this movement to bring some “big city resources” here for entrepreneurs. I have watched Ron over the last couple of years in several settings; Ron has always given credit to the “village” of people who have come alongside to bring all these resources and events to Orlando.

 Ron says he sits somewhere in the middle between a 4-hour workweek and a 12-hour day philosophy. Although an entrepreneur’s brain never shuts off, Ron knows that family and finding time to give back are important. He says the secret to his ability to be noticed by the Kauffman Foundation (sponsor of 1 Million Cups), Rollins College where he resides as an entrepreneur-in-residence, and sitting on Wharton’s IGEL Board is to give first. When you give and ask “where can I help”, opportunity comes back to you. Orlando’s startup community is competitive, yet supportive and willing to help, Ron says. As a fellow resident and entrepreneur in Orlando, I couldn’t agree more.

Ron currently is founder and co-founder of several early stage startups. He also sits on the board of directors of a for profit and a non-profit in town.  I’m sure we’ll see more from this innovative entrepreneur who “gets shit done” and fills the needs he finds.

 

    Soles4Soles Hikes to Costa Rica with an Orlando Writer

    One question: “Will you go?” While I was in Nashville, I met a staff member, Lisa Pointe, from Soles4Souls. She kindly gave me a tour after I expressed my interest in social enterprise. From that initial contact I was asked to join a team from Ohio State University that would be doing a shoe distribution in Costa Rica in May and cover the story. What an opportunity! What an adventure!

    A simple request is about to change the lives of several and I get to watch it unfold live.

    As I landed I was greeted by 10 student athletes, their advisors from OSU, and Taylar Proctor from Soles4Souls. We boarded the bus and headed to our host facility in San Jose. The first evening was uneventful, settling in and doing introductions. Although the students came from Ohio State, home of the Buckeyes, most didn’t know each other.

    The next morning though, we boarded the bus early to head to our first shoe distribution at a local school. The team of OSU athletes were diving in, sorting sizes, fitting shoes on little feet, and putting smiles on the little faces. While the kids waited their turn some of our team played soccer, jump rope, and basketball with the Costa Rican children; others put Buckeye “tattoos” on the kids. This team came to serve and serve they did! In under six hours we gave out nearly 1000 pairs of shoes.

    The following morning was much like yesterday. Except today we stopped on the way to the distribution site to see where these children lived. The “shanty town” was little more than tin boxes housing as many as 14 people in a home not any larger than a tool shed. Our host said it was one of the most densely populated “shanty towns” in San Jose. Heartbreaking.

    These kids definitely needed shoes. The OSU athletes worked tirelessly and quickly. Today more than 800 shoes were given out in under four hours! Again, the athletes didn’t just put shoes on the feet of the students; they interacted and played with them putting ear-to-ear smiles on their faces.

    Saturday we were up at 5:00 am to take a bus ride (fully loaded with students and shoes with barely enough room to sit!) for three hours before hopping in a water taxi to ride upstream for an hour. The rainforest was our destination for the third shoe distribution and this was the only way of getting there. By this time the students had become friends. They bus was a frenzy of music, lively conversation, and bantering. Part of the intrigue of the week was watching these students go from nearly strangers on the same campus to a tight-knit group that want to stay in touch when they return home. Somehow serving others will break through the cliques and bind hearts and lives.

    After settling in at the rainforest lodge we board the water taxi once again for a short ride upstream. The town has 400 residents and this distribution is open to all; however, due to our shoe sizes remaining we won’t be able to fit men or larger women’s feet. The team sets up quickly and welcomes the throng of people into a small school room to be sized and fitted. We are seeing moms and babes coming together, many without shoes on their feet. Each leave with a pair of shoes and a smile filled with hope on their faces. Sadly, there were some who were so used to walking barefoot, they left carrying their new pair of shoes. But, for many, entire families lives were changed that day by a pair of shoes.

    Our last shoe distribution was scheduled as we descended the mountain to return to San Jose. Unfortunately, the road was closed and our team couldn’t meet the delivery of shoes to get where we needed to be. The last distribution had to be postponed for another trip.

    Serving others changes lives. As nearly 2,000 pairs of shoes were given out during our six days in Costa Rica we watched the hearts of the OSU students melt. We watched athletes who had never spoken on campus connect on social media and plan to meet regularly once they returned home. We watched as the team stooped on bended knee to share a small gift, a kind word, or a hug with a child that spoke another language. Language, age, and location should never be a reason not to serve. Serving makes all of those things irrelevant and will give you an experience you’ll never forget. I know I’ll never forget how humbled and honored I felt to be invited to write about and participate in a life-changing experience. I had a front row seat as many of these students shared that they had never left the United States to serve others.

    Soles4Souls doesn’t just change the lives of those who receive shoes; they change the lives of all who take a few days out of their life to serve. One question: “Will you go?”

     

    Entrepreneurs: Learn, Exchange, and Unite

    The vibe in the room was electric as the kickoff event opened in Orlando for Global Entrepreneurship Week on November 17, 2014!  Orlando’s The Big Exchange helped bring Global Entrepreneurship Week, sponsored by the Kauffman Foundation, to Orlando. Global Entrepreneurship Week was announced as an idea in 2007. By 2008, 77 countries and over 3 million participated in the week-long unconference consisting of over 25,000 activities. This is truly a worldwide movement. In Orlando, entrepreneurs spoke, shared, collaborated, taught, learned, and networked. From the feedback and the “Tweet Wall”, we believe everyone that participated was inspired to further action and found the workshops beneficial. Each day workshops and mentoring “open office hours” were offered. There were several networking opportunities, too. This week could not have been successful without the support of the sponsors, the Root Radius team handling the logistics, and the many entrepreneurs that volunteered their time and talent to attend and assist with the power-packed schedule of events. Orlando’s entrepreneurial community really showed their collaborative spirit and their desire to help others succeed. If you are a Thinker, Maker, Artist, or Educator we hope you’ll join us next year.

    Electricity!

    The vibe in the room is electric! Eight social entrepreneurs came to Downtown Credo to pitch their businesses. Each one resonates with the Credo of meaning, impact, and community. The room is full long before the pitches start. The first pitch is from Care Spotter followed by two urban farming concepts, Edible Orlando Junior Academy and Growing Orlando. The next concepts, Market Colors and One Purse, focused on helping women escape from human trafficking. Next, Rebuild Globally shared the 760% growth they’ve had in the first four years of operation. They focus on helping women produce a sustainable income to remove her family from poverty. The last two business pitches focused on our school-aged children in our local community. These businesses are The Human Experience and SourceCode B46.

    The awards will be announced at the third annual CREDO Awards on November 6, 2014. If you’d like to attend, tickets are available here.

    Meaning. Impact. Community.

    September 10, 2014/in Community Impact /by Royce Gomez

    If you want to be inspired, spend time with Ben Hoyer of Downtown Credo. His
    cornerstones of meaning, impact, and community are what this column is about and what
    has defined my life as an entrepreneur.

    Ben’s Credo states “Life is worth living. I refuse to merely exist. I pursue a life of meaning
    and purpose, fulfillment and joy. The world is not yet as it ought to be. Neither is my city.
    Neither am I. Yet, I reject apathy and despair. I engage the world, my city, and myself to
    make an impact for good. I am not alone. I press through narcissism, isolation and
    self-sufficiency striving to live in authentic community.”

    If this resonates with you like it did for me you might want to apply to pitch your social
    entrepreneurial idea. (I will be submitting my idea. Will you join me?) Ben has worked
    tirelessly to get some of the most successful entrepreneurs to invest their time, money, and
    knowledge in supporting someone with an idea and courage to live with meaning and have
    an impact in their community. I have made Orlando my community over the last couple of
    years and am ready to live with meaning and impact while rejecting apathy. If you have an
    idea, join me. If not, come and cheer on the contestants October 15th.

    Financial Empowerment Through Shopping

    Bajalia, changing the world while shopping the world. Simple tagline, right? But, what exactly is Bajalia? Debbie Farah, founder of Bajalia, believes that financially empowering women brings freedom. As a child Debbie watched women stay oppressed by not having access to their own money. She realized by the time she was a teenager that she didn’t want to choose that life. She pursued a career and empowered herself financially. Bajalia was birthed from Debbie’s personal experience. Now Debbie through a social enterprise business model, Bajalia, empowers women around the world by using fair trade, training, and community development to alleviate poverty, educates girls, and empowers artisans as they improve their lives.

    Bajalia offers women advance payment, assistance to purchase equipment, and training to teach the women how to establish a sustainable income that will support their families long-term. One of the most important things Bajalia does to help these women grow their businesses to a sustainable level is provide marketing channels to share their stories. Debbie has effectively used her corporate training to partner with HSN, international governments, and Business Council for Peace to maximize the effectiveness of their work to provide assistance to the artisans to provide a sustainable living wage for their families.

    Some of the causes that are impacted by Bajalia’s mission is human trafficking, community transformation, AIDS, and helping the disabled. A fair living wage, non-exploitive working conditions, and using eco-friendly products are focal points to be successful in the communities they enter. Bajalia is currently in over 15 countries.

    The impact Debbie’s vision has made on women around the world would make me proud to be a part of her small, but mighty team. Empowering women is an integral part of maintaining a healthy community. Debbie’s vision is coming home; she is working to use the same business model to help women in our local community. If you’d like to be a part of this by partnering with Bajalia, please contact Debbie. Perhaps you’d just like to follow the artisans’ stories, follow Bajalia on social media.

    Trends in Philanthropy…. Right Here in Central Florida

    August 28, 2014/in Community Impact /by Royce Gomez

    What an event Trends in Philanthropy was last week! The sponsors couldn’t have organized a better lineup of speakers. First, we heard from Shawn Seipler, Founder of Clean the World (CTW). CTW has earned the first B-corp designation in Florida. Shawn spent time sharing his business model, his vision, and the new programs he is launching.

    Next, we heard inspiration from Ben Hoyer, Founder of Downtown Credo. Ben shared how a conversation with a friend ignited a spark of an idea which began a journey to visit coffee farmers in a remote region of Guatemala. Today this journey allows us in the community to drink coffee while giving back.

    Finally, Bahiyyah Maroon from Eripio Institute spoke. Bahiyyah is a wealth of knowledge and shares her knowledge as a professor at Rollins College, contributing her knowledge to the Social Entrepreneur students. She shared how the nonprofit sector is the third sector embracing innovation, social transformation, and inspiration. Bahiyyah explained how understanding and digging deeper into your fiscal proxies will help tell your story more fully.

    Mark Brewer from the http://cffound.org/Community Foundation always presents a program that gives us inspiration, education, and so much more!